Take with a grain of salt

(I’m abed with a virus, but meanwhile–)

The pancakes smelled -at first whiff- yummy.  But then, scorched.  Kind of.  Not the pan’s-too-hot-scorched, but overly browned.  I nibbled on a corner of one left unfinished in a puddle of syrup.

“Did they seem kind of … salty?”  I asked my daughter.

Yes.

Ah-ha.  “You know, baking soda tastes salty, and aids in browning — that’s why pretzels are dipped in baking soda water before baking.”

“The recipe did say to add baking soda,” explained my son.

I read his scribbled index card, and snorted.  “Next time, use one of our general cookbooks.”

“I’ve used that site before …” he protested, annoyed with his normally reliable resource.

“Don’t believe everything you read on the Internets — take it with a grain of salt.  Not 3 1/2 TABLESPOONS of baking soda!”

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Coming soon

some new posts – after I get some sleep !

4011 IF EAT THEN SIT

My hungry 9-month old grandson is being a wiggle-worm.  He wants his banana now, and like Prot, is trying to eat it whole, peel and all.

“Come on lad, let Grandma mash this up for you – no, we don’t eat the peel – here’s your high chair -”

Much squirming and complaining, “NANA NANA!”  (I’m not sure if by “nana” he means banana or some pet name for grandma; I’m usually the one who brings home the bananas from the market, and the one who feeds him an evening snack of “happy smile fruits” — our code name for the nosh of choice, especially if we’ve run out.)

“Ow no let go of my glasses, Grandma can’t feed you until you’re in your chair-”  This operation of Insert Boy B Into Chair C almost takes two women.

I revert back to child-training using simple commands. Given enough repetitions, it will sink in, just like “OPEN” [mouth], “NO BITING”, “TOUCH GENTLY” [flowers, cats], “STILL” [stay in place for diapering], “REACH UP” [un/dressing], and all those other thrilling conversations.

“IF eat, THEN sit!”

The lad was sufficiently startled by this novel command to pause a split-second, thus allowing us to plop his tuchis on the chair and snap on the tray.  We’ll be using the IF-THEN logic construct for the next few years, along with FIRST-THEN.  (There’s nothing like reinforcing order of operations, whether mathematical or procedural.)

Now I can finally start spooning mashed banana into the lad’s mouth, and he’s thumping his feet and smacking his hands on the tray with delight, exclaiming a pleased, “Nom-nom nom!”  (Seriously.)

“That’s a good boy,” cooed his mum, “Listen to Grandma’s Boolean logic!”

Ah, the great moments of geeky family life – gotta love ’em!

P.S.  4011 refers to an imaginary line of programming code, and also to the grocer’s PLU number for bananas.